Episode 212: 10 Things You Need to Know About Data Security

Episode 212: 10 Things You Need to Know About Data Security

Episode 212: 10 Things You Need to Know About Data Security 560 420 Carlos L Chacon

Twenty years ago, the objection to implementing security on the basis of performance had validity—especially for smaller organizations. Security was a pain in the neck; however, how many of us are still hanging on to some of those old biases. Even worse, some of us IT pros seem to put up objections to doing the most basic security procedures—sending usernames and passwords in unencrypted emails for example. In this episode we hear from Karen Lopez, a long time speaker on data architecture and security about 10 things she thinks those of us with data stewardship responsibilities should consider.

Karen Lopez

Our Guest

Karen Lopez

I have more than twenty years of experience helping large organizations manage large, multi-project information technology programs. I’m a project manager and data architect. I specialize in being practical and getting stuff done over allegiances to methodologies or check lists.

Most of my work has been on turnaround projects: helping teams get back to the original goals quickly, but not sacrificing security, reliability or flexibility.

I really love my work and enjoy networking with others who have experiences to share.

I am also available as a spokesperson for Information Technology issues.

Specialties: Project Management, Information Management, IT Methods and Methodologies, Information Privacy, ARTS Data Model, Data Modeling, Process Modeling. Industries; Retail, Energy, Health, Government, Defense.

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“I see security as protecting the integrity of the data and all of the systems around that data.”


Karen Lopez

3 Takeaways

  1. IT personnel still send usernames and passwords in email. Not good.
  2. Implementing security is becoming more straightforward
  3. Security is everybody’s responsibility, not just the domain of a security team.

Imagine what’s possible with a dedicated SQL specialist on your team.

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